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Treeing Walker Coonhound: The Definitive Guide

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Treeing Walker Coonhound Introduction

When choosing a dog to adopt, there is a lot to consider. The type of breed can be a great indication of what a specific dog might be like. Shepherds are active, terriers are better for apartment living, and hounds are best for those that love the outdoors. While some breeds are better fits for specific families than others, there is truly a dog out there for everyone.

Treeing Walker Coonhounds are smart dogs who love to exercise and explore their environment. True to their hound nature, Treeing Walker Coonhounds love to be outdoors and can be rather vocal with some impressive howling abilities. Because of this, they aren’t best for apartment living but rather fit in with a home that has lots of space to roam and sniff.

Treeing Walker Coonhounds do very well with owners who have had other dogs before rather than novice dog owners. They can be left alone for short periods but don’t like to be left alone all day. If you are someone who works from home, this breed is the perfect fit for you. Treeing Walker Coonhounds can do well in both hot and cold weather, though they prefer rather mild weather on a day-to-day basis.

One thing to note about Treeing Walker Coonhounds is that they are very sensitive to their surroundings. They take notice of everything that is going on in their surroundings and may get stressed-out by chaos. If you live in a home with a large and loud family, often host parties and events in your home, or live next to a loud railroad or airport, this may not be the ideal environment for a Treeing Walker Coonhound.

Despite being an active dog that loves the outdoors and exploring, Treeing Walker Coonhounds are pretty affectionate with their owners. They love to cuddle up after a long day and sneak into your bed if you’ll let them. This breed is good with children and doesn’t mind living in a home with little ones running around. Treeing Walker Coonhounds can also live in a home with other dogs and aren’t aggressive to new dogs as long as they have been socialized and trained from a young age.

If you are looking for a watchdog to protect your home and family, a Treeing Walker Coonhound is a great candidate to do so. These dogs aren’t overly friendly to strangers, meaning that they will alert you if they notice that one is approaching your home. While they are protective, they will still warm up to strangers that you are welcoming into your home. You won’t have to worry about your Treeing Walker Coonhound scaring off new friends or family that they haven’t met when they come to visit.

Treeing Walker Coonhounds are very easy to groom and maintain, so you won’t have to worry about taking them to a specialty groomer regularly. While they aren’t hypoallergenic, they shed an average amount, saving you from having to clean up an abundance of dog hair. Standing at an average of 20 to 27 inches tall, and typically weighing between 45 to 80 pounds, Treeing Walker Coonhounds are the perfect medium-sized dog to join an active family.

This very active dog needs a lot of daily exercise. They greatly enjoy going for extended walks multiple times per day, exploring a large yard, and playing with their family. Because of their strong hound nose and explorative nature, Treeing Walker Coonhounds tend to wander off. When not in a fenced yard or secured area, they will need to be on a leash to ensure that their wanderlust doesn’t lead them too far away from their home.

The Treeing Walker Coonhound coat can vary from white with black spots and tan markings to black with white markings and tan trim. These two different coats are known as saddle-backs or blanket-backs. The Treeing Walker Coonhound coat is smooth and shiny, making them sleek and ideal for navigating the outdoor world.

This breed has a life expectancy of 12 to 13 years and are generally very healthy dogs. Though they aren’t known for an abundance of health problems, all dogs are susceptible to experiencing a condition or two throughout their lives. Knowing the most common health conditions that Treeing Walker Coonhounds may experience can help you stay aware and get them prompt medical care if these conditions do arise.

History of the Treeing Walker Coonhound

Sometimes breed history can be a little difficult to trace back, and knowing when the first dog of a specific breed was born may not always be possible. The history of Treeing Walker Coonhounds is pretty clear cut and well understood, as it typically is with pure-breed dogs. Treeing Walker Coonhounds can be traced back to being descendants of the English Foxhound and the English Coonhound, who arrived in the United States during the mid-1700s.

English Coonhounds have descended primarily from Foxhounds and other hunting hounds. They share common ancestry with all other coonhounds and were used mostly to hunt raccoons during the day and eventually, the American red fox by night.

Brought over by a man named Thomas Walker, English Foxhounds soon developed into what would be known as Virginia Hounds and eventually, the Walker Hound. Upon their arrival in America, English Foxhounds encountered much rougher terrain than they were used to. Because of this, they were bred over time to better adapt to these conditions.

The Treeing Walker Coonhound is thought to be the result of crossing a black and tan dog known as the Tennessee Lead, who had excellent working skills, with a Walker Hound in the 1800s. The Treeing Walker Coonhound was created with hunting and tracking in mind. People wanted dogs to help them in the fields and on farms and ranches, and obtaining more breeds to do so was the ultimate goal. This specific crossing is what led to the Treeing Walker Coonhound that we know and love today.

Treeing Walker Coonhounds are native to the United States and serve a variety of purposes. They were initially created to help with hunting, specifically by helping to track down quarries with their strong sense of smell. They can follow scents for very long distances and usually to the last known location of a specific animal.

One of the most well-known jobs of Treeing Walker Coonhounds is hunting raccoons, hence their Coonhound name. With their excellent tracking abilities and loud howl, Treeing Walker Coonhounds often would lead their owners to a tree that an animal that they were hunting had run up. To signal their location in the tree, the Treeing Walker Coonhound would howl loudly.

Treeing Walker Coonhounds were originally included in the English Coonhound breed group’s United Kennel Club recognition in 1905, though this later went on to change.

In 1945 the United Kennel Club officially recognized the Treeing Walker Coonhound as its own breed, though it was many years before the American Kennel Club did the same. The Treeing Walker Coonhound was officially recognized as its own breed by the American Kennel Club in January of 2021, making it the 174th breed to be recognized by the American Kennel Club.

In the modern day, Treeing Walker Coonhounds are the most popular hound to use in competition coon hunts. They are known to pass up older tracks in exchange for fresher ones, leading to a higher number of raccoons that are caught in a shorter time.

Treeing Walker Coonhound standing in park

Treeing Walker Coonhound Intelligence

Treeing Walker Coonhounds are known for their extreme intelligence and tracking abilities. Born with a strong sense of smell, they can follow the path used by a specific animal for great distances even after they have been out of the area for quite a while.

While Treeing Walker Coonhounds are very intelligent, they aren’t always easy to train. Treeing Walker Coonhounds are used to having ample room to lead, not follow, their owners. They like to take charge and perform their duties rather than listen to commands that they are given. Because of this, training them might be a bit difficult.

Though Treeing Walker Coonhounds aren’t known to be eager to please or easy to train, they can still be very obedient dogs. The most important thing to remember when training a Treeing Walker Coonhound is that they respond better to positive reinforcement. Try to focus on praise, pets, and treats when they do something right in the training process. In addition, avoid harsh words and actions when they aren’t performing how you want them.

With a lot of patience, practice, and consistency, your Treeing Walker Coonhound can be very impressive with the commands and tricks that they can learn. Potty training, obedience, and even hunting are not out of the question when it comes to Treeing Walker Coonhounds, despite their stubborn streak. Be sure to find a routine that works for you and get professional training help if you need guidance!

Treeing Walker Coonhound Cognitive Health

For any dog, cognitive health is an essential part of life. Healthy cognitive functioning allows dogs to listen to commands, abide by household rules, maintain relationships with their owners, and do the things that they love. Cognitive health is responsible for problem-solving abilities, memory, motor skills, and much more.

Despite Treeing Walker Coonhounds having a very high intelligence level, they can still be susceptible to cognitive health issues. These issues typically occur as a dog grows older and are caused by components of the aging process itself. Cognitive health issues in dogs look very similar to those in humans, such as dementia. The most common cognitive health issue for any dog to experience, including Treeing Walker Coonhounds, is called canine cognitive dysfunction.

Canine Cognitive Dysfunction

Canine cognitive dysfunction, also known as canine dementia, is a cognitive impairment that affects a wide variety of dogs. No breed, including Treeing Walker Coonhounds, is more likely to develop canine dementia than another. This condition is most commonly seen in dogs that are over nine years of age and also in spayed females.

Canine cognitive dysfunction (or CCD) is a result of the effects that the aging process has on a dog’s mind. Specifically, canine cognitive dysfunction is caused by an occurrence of plaque buildup in the brain. This plaque buildup is due to the presence of abnormal proteins. Nerve damage occurs due to this plaque buildup, which results in an impairment of cognitive functioning. This condition can affect your Treeing Walker Coonhound in a variety of ways.

One of the most common symptoms of canine dementia in Treeing Walker Coonhounds is memory loss. A Treeing Walker Coonhound who is experiencing canine dementia may forget household rules or previously learned tricks and commands. CCD may also cause motor skill impairment. Treeing Walker Coonhounds with canine cognitive dysfunction may have a harder time getting up when they are lying down or jumping into your car or onto your bed. They may also have a difficult time finding a toy or treat that they have dropped. If you notice any of these symptoms in your Treeing Walker Coonhound, be sure to get them to the vet for an accurate diagnosis.

Unfortunately, though canine cognitive dysfunction is a very common condition in dogs, obtaining an accurate diagnosis can be difficult. One of the most common reasons for CCD to go unnoticed is the slow onset of symptoms. Certain symptoms of this condition may onset earlier or later than others, making it difficult to notice that they are related to one another.

In addition, canine cognitive dysfunction can commonly overlap with other health issues, such as diabetes, arthritis, and cancer. Because of this, symptoms of canine cognitive dysfunction may be blamed on these other health conditions, or simply as typical aging behaviors.

Unfortunately, there are no known ways to reverse or cure canine cognitive dysfunction once it has developed. Despite this, Treeing Walker Coonhounds can still live healthy and happy lives with this cognitive impairment. In addition, there are many preventative steps that you can take to lessen the chances of your Treeing Walker Coonhound developing canine cognitive dysfunction.

One of the best ways to prevent CCD in Treeing Walker Coonhounds is through diet. Given the importance of maintaining healthy cognitive functioning as dogs age, many senior dog foods are formulated to help combat this condition. Foods that contain antioxidants and omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to improve cognitive functioning and combat the progress and symptoms of canine cognitive dysfunction. If you have a younger Treeing Walker Coonhound, these agents can be included in their diet through supplementation to prevent CCD as they age. Always consult with your vet before beginning any supplements or dietary changes.

In addition to diet, mental stimulation is a very promising way to prevent canine cognitive dysfunction in Treeing Walker Coonhounds. Mental stimulation keeps their brain active and essentially exercises their cognitive health. Treeing Walker Coonhounds can be stimulated in a variety of ways. Puzzle toys and feeder bowls are great tools to keep them engaged, utilizing their motor and problem-solving skills, and encouraging other aspects of cognitive functioning. These tools can be utilized at any age and are typically found at your local pet store.

While CCD may seem daunting, you can easily take preventative steps at home to help your Treeing Walker Coonhound avoid this condition. Find the one that works best for you to provide your Treeing Walker Coonhound a happy and healthy life as they age.

Treeing Walker Coonhound standing in leaves

Treeing Walker Coonhound Stress

Just like humans, Treeing Walker Coonhounds are likely to experience stress more than once in their life. The amount of stress that they experience at once can vary greatly, along with how often they become stressed. Nevertheless, Treeing Walker Coonhounds should be prepared for stress when it arises and how to deal with it.

What causes dogs to stress can depend on a variety of factors, such as their breed, temperament, personality, personal history, age, and much more. For example, a dog that was in a shelter for a long time before getting adopted may become stressed when left alone. A young dog or puppy may experience stress when they are first adopted and separated from their parents and siblings.

Knowing what causes your Treeing Walker Coonhound stress is the first step in minimizing this experience for them. To do so, try and notice when your Treeing Walker Coonhound exhibits signs of stress. Do they begin to whine when the garbage truck goes by? Perhaps loud and unknown noises are causing them stress. Do they begin to pace when they haven’t had a walk yet? Lack of mental stimulation and exercise may be what is triggering their stress.

Try to pay attention to what is going on in your dog’s environment when they begin to show signs of stress. This will help you to take the next steps towards minimizing the stress that they feel when these triggers occur.

There are many possible signs of stress in Treeing Walker Coonhounds. One of the most common is vocalization. If your Treeing Walker Coonhound is howling, whining, or barking without someone at your door or a need to be let outside to go potty, this may be because they are trying to communicate their stress. Restlessness and pacing are very common signs of stress. Stressed Treeing Walker Coonhounds may do laps around their backyard or coffee table.

Stressed dogs may produce extra saliva and drool a lot. If you notice your Treeing Walker Coonhound drooling more than usual, they may be under stress. A stressed Treeing Walker Coonhound may also exhibit unwanted behaviors that can be destructive, such as digging or chewing.

While stress is inevitable, there are steps that you can take as a Treeing Walker Coonhound owner to help combat this experience and even minimize it. One of the most common causes of stress for Treeing Walker Coonhounds is a lack of mental stimulation, which can lead to boredom. Treeing Walker Coonhounds are very active and smart dogs who are used to being put to work in the fields and hunting. Because of this, it’s in their nature to want to be busy a lot of the time. A Treeing Walker Coonhound who doesn’t have much to occupy their time may exhibit signs of stress on a regular or rare basis.

One of the best ways to avoid stress in Treeing Walker Coonhounds is to find ways to stimulate their brain and keep them from becoming bored. Socialization is a great way to do exactly that. When engaging with other dogs or humans, Treeing Walker Coonhounds are using their problem-solving skills to understand their relationships. They can keep busy with navigating how to behave around these individuals and get a lot of their energy out. Going to the dog park, going on long walks, or meeting up with other canine friends can be great ways to prevent your Treeing Walker Coonhound from feeling stressed due to boredom.

In addition to socialization, puzzle toys and feeder bowls are great ways to keep your Treeing Walker Coonhound stimulated and prevent stress. When using these objects, your Treeing Walker Coonhound will be focused on trying to reach whatever treat or food is inside of their puzzle or bowl. Their mind will remain busy until they accomplish this task, keeping them stimulated and engaged without much work on your part.

The last thing that any Treeing Walker Coonhound owner wants is for their dog to feel stressed. While all dogs will experience this at least once in their life, and most likely more than that, there are still steps that you can take as an owner to minimize their stress. Mental stimulation can prevent boredom and stress in your Treeing Walker Coonhound. Give these various stimulation strategies a try and see which ones work best for you and your Treeing Walker Coonhound.

Anxiety in Treeing Walker Coonhound

While dogs are likely to experience stress at least once in their life, they can also experience anxiety. Different from stress, which is triggered by a specific event, anxiety is a feeling of fear or apprehension about what’s going to happen. Where stress lives in the past, anxiety lives more in the future. Though they are similar, some dogs are more prone to anxiety than others.

Almost all dogs will experience anxiety at least once in their lifetime. This anxiety can be triggered by a variety of things, such as being alone, loud noises, new places, and much more. Knowing what anxiety looks like in Treeing Walker Coonhounds and what causes it can help you to provide your dog with an anxiety-free life.

Symptoms of anxiety are very similar to symptoms of stress, though they may be more severe in their presence. For example, while a stressed dog may whine, an anxious dog may whine much louder and more consistently. Anxious dogs may even begin to shake, and in addition to drooling, they may pant. An increased heart rate is a very common sign of anxiety in all dogs, including Treeing Walker Coonhounds.

Anxious dogs may have body language as an indicator of anxiety. An anxious Treeing Walker Coonhound may have ears that face backward and down, or they might hide or cower.

In some cases, anxious Treeing Walker Coonhounds may chew, bite, or lick at their skin. This can lead to skin and coat issues that could be avoided without anxiety. In addition, some anxious Treeing Walker Coonhounds may not eat as much as they usually do, leading to unwanted weight loss. If you notice that your pup is losing weight as well as exhibiting signs of anxiety, be sure to get them to the vet.

One of the most common causes of anxiety in Treeing Walker Coonhounds is a busy household. Treeing Walker Coonhounds are very sensitive dogs, so loud noises and lots of activity can cause them to feel uneasy. If you notice that your Treeing Walker Coonhound becomes anxious when your house is busy, this may be the cause. Try to find anxiety remedies that work for them when you know that your home’s activity level is going to be high.

In addition to sensitivity, being alone can be another common trigger of anxiety in your pup. Many dogs experience anxiety when they are alone, which is specifically known as separation anxiety.

close up of Treeing Walker Coonhound

Separation Anxiety

Separation anxiety is a very common occurrence in many dog breeds, including Treeing Walker Coonhounds. Dogs who form an especially strong bond with their owners are the most likely to develop separation anxiety. With such an affectionate personality, it’s not a huge surprise that Treeing Walker Coonhounds can be susceptible to this condition.

Treeing Walker Coonhounds with separation anxiety not only feel anxious about their owner being away but also when they return. While this condition can be troubling for any owner and their dog, there are ways that you can prevent and combat it at home.

One of the most promising ways to prevent separation anxiety in Treeing Walker Coonhounds is through socialization. When socialized at a young age, dogs are much less likely to develop any anxiety, including separation anxiety. This young socialization allows dogs to explore their environment safely, exposing them to a variety of situations, places, dogs, and humans. During this process, they can overcome some possible fears of the unknown and reduce their likelihood of being sensitive to anxiety triggers, such as being alone.

Aside from socialization, crate training can be another promising way to prevent or reduce separation anxiety in Treeing Walker Coonhounds. Crate training provides your dog with a safe space that is meant just for them. Being in this safe space when they’re alone can make them feel less anxious and nervous about being alone. Though crate training a larger dog such as a Treeing Walker Coonhound may seem difficult, with the right technique and strategies, any dog can be crate trained. Both you and your Treeing Walker Coonhound will benefit from utilizing a crate to reduce separation anxiety.

Supplementation can also reduce anxiety, including separation anxiety. CBD is a very common supplement on the market today that can calm your dog down and help them relax when faced with an anxiety trigger such as being alone. Be sure to talk to your vet before beginning any supplements, including CBD.

Treeing Walker Coonhound Allergies

Allergies can be a problematic condition for many dogs, including Treeing Walker Coonhounds, to face. Just like with humans, allergies in dogs can be due to several things. The three types of allergies that a dog can experience are flea allergies, skin allergies, and food allergies.

Allergies of all types in both humans and Treeing Walker Coonhounds are caused by a hypersensitive immune system. This hypersensitive immune system reacts to foreign substances and attacks them. These foreign substances are harmless things such as grass, dust, and pollen. Though they seem harmless to others, your Treeing Walker Coonhound’s immune system can see them as a threat and attack them. When the immune system attacks these allergens, it triggers an allergic reaction.

For Treeing Walker Coonhounds, the most common type of allergies to experience is food allergies. These can affect your pup and should be watched out for by an owner.

Food Allergies

Food allergies are a common condition in dogs such as the Treeing Walker Coonhound. This condition can impact the life of your Treeing Walker Coonhound by making them feel itchy and uncomfortable. While human allergies manifest in symptoms such as sneezing, coughing, watery eyes, and even hives, dog allergies manifest in their skin, causing them itchiness.

When experiencing food allergies, your Treeing Walker Coonhound may feel like they have an itch, or many, that can never be fully relieved. This constant state of itchiness can make your Treeing Walker Coonhound feel lethargic and even distressed.

One of the most common signs of food allergies in Treeing Walker Coonhounds is excessive scratching. Dogs with this condition may lick at their paws or rub affected areas against furniture or walls. The most common places that are affected by food allergies include legs, paws, and hind legs, though all areas of the body can be affected by allergies.

Aside from skin and coat symptoms, food allergies can also cause gut health symptoms. Treeing Walker Coonhounds with food allergies may experience diarrhea and vomiting. If you notice any gut health issues in your dog, be sure to get them to the vet as soon as possible.

Ear health can also be affected by allergies, and dogs with allergies may develop recurring ear infections that can be rather painful. If you notice that your Treeing Walker Coonhound keeps experiencing ear infections despite treatment and preventative measures, allergies may be to blame.

While allergies can cause dogs to be uncomfortable, they don’t shorten the life expectancy of your Treeing Walker Coonhound puppy or adult. You and your hound can still have many fun-filled years together even with allergies. Most puppies will not experience food allergies as the typical age of onset is after one to two years of age. It’s important to note that despite the typical onset of food allergies being relatively young, dogs can develop this condition at any age. Food allergies are more commonly seen in Treeing Walker Coonhound adults compared to Treeing Walker Coonhound puppies.

Food allergies must be diagnosed by your vet. During this process, they will perform an allergy test that will narrow down all possible allergens to the one that is triggering your Treeing Walker Coonhound’s immune system. Some common food allergens include beef, chicken, soy, grains, and more. Once your vet has identified the allergen that your Treeing Walker Coonhound is allergic to, they will recommend eliminating this ingredient from their diet.

All of these allergens are commonly found in dog foods, meaning that you may have to change the diet of your Treeing Walker Coonhound completely. In doing so, you will eliminate their chance of having an allergic reaction to this agent and the unwanted symptoms that come with them.

When recovering from food allergies after changing their diet, you can help eliminate symptoms in your Treeing Walker Coonhound in a variety of ways. Supporting skin health is a great way to speed up your dog’s recovery from food allergies. Omega-3 fatty acids are a great thing to include in your Treeing Walker Coonhound’s diet to reduce skin inflammation and itchiness. This can be found in a variety of foods that focus on skin and coat health, as well as in supplements. As always, be sure to consult with your vet before beginning new supplements or diet changes for your pup.

After removing allergens from their diet and healing their skin, your Treeing Walker Coonhound will live a healthy and happy life that is free from food allergy symptoms.

Treeing Walker Coonhound standing on grass

Treeing Walker Coonhound Gut Health

Gut health is an extremely important component of overall health for both dogs and humans. A majority of the immune system is housed in the gut. If the gut is unhealthy, immune system functioning may be impaired. This can lead to your Treeing Walker Coonhound being more at risk for contradicting common viruses, infections, and diseases due to poor gut health.

Knowing the most common gut health issues for your Treeing Walker Coonhound to develop can help you monitor symptoms if they do arise and to get them prompt medical care. Just because a breed is more prone to a certain gut health condition doesn’t mean that they are destined to experience it. Many Treeing Walker Coonhounds will go their entire lives without ever experiencing any gut health issues whatsoever. For Treeing Walker Coonhounds, the most common gut health issue to develop is called Gastric Dilatation Volvulus.

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Gastric Dilatation Volvulus

Gastric dilatation volvulus, also known as bloat, is a very serious gut health issue that typically affects large breeds such as the Treeing Walker Coonhound. This condition can be deadly if left untreated and every Treeing Walker Coonhound owner should be aware of it for their dog’s safety.

Bloat occurs when a dog’s stomach becomes twisted at both ends from spinning around itself. This causes a blockage of escaping liquids, gas, and other stomach contents. Due to the blockage, this buildup of gas and liquid causes the stomach to expand — similar to a balloon — which is called dilatation. This is what causes your Treeing Walker Coonhound’s stomach to appear larger than normal and feel relatively solid, almost as if they swallowed a very large amount of food or water.

Gastric dilatation volvulus must be treated by a vet as soon as you notice symptoms to avoid fatality. The most common symptom of bloat is a hard, bloated abdomen. If you notice that your Treeing Walker Coonhound’s stomach suddenly looks larger than usual and is firm when touched, get them into the vet as soon as possible.

In addition to a bloated belly, gastric dilatation volvulus may cause your Treeing Walker Coonhound to have a difficult time lying down or becoming comfortable. A Treeing Walker Coonhound that is experiencing this condition may pace or have an unusual posture.

Attempting to vomit is another very serious symptom of bloat. Often, a dog with this condition will attempt to vomit with little to no success.

Excess saliva production can be an indicator of gastric dilatation volvulus in Treeing Walker Coonhounds. If you notice that your dog seems to be drooling more than usual, this may be because they are experiencing bloat.

Breathing changes may occur in Treeing Walker Coonhounds with bloat. This condition causes a reduction in space within the chest, limiting the lungs’ ability to expand. In addition, the pain and distress that bloat causes can also lead to breathing changes.

Rapid heart rate can be an early sign of pain and distress caused by dog bloat. As this condition progresses, a rapid heart rate can be an indication of your Treeing Walker Coonhound puppy or adult going into shock due to this condition. As shock worsens, heart rates will drop, signaling a very serious health state. If you ever notice an abnormal heartbeat in your Treeing Walker Coonhound, be sure to get them medical care as soon as possible.

Given how serious this condition is, you should get your dog to the vet as soon as possible when you notice symptoms. Gastric dilatation volvulus must be treated by a vet. Once treated, your Treeing Walker Coonhound can go back to living a healthy and happy life. This condition won’t affect their life expectancy after they have recovered.

Though bloat must be treated by a vet, you can still take preventative measures at home as an owner.

Dogs who are fed more than once per day are less likely to experience bloat. Feeding your Treeing Walker Coonhound twice or three times per day will decrease this bloat likelihood. In addition, try to control their eating speed with feeder bowls. Dogs who eat quickly are more likely to develop bloat. With these preventative measures and prompt medical care, your Treeing Walker Coonhound can live a healthy and happy life despite its risk for this condition.

Treeing Walker Coonhound laying on couch

Treeing Walker Coonhound Eye Health

While Treeing Walker Coonhounds rely heavily on their sense of smell when tracking and hunting, they also use their eyes during these activities. Healthy eyes allow them to play ball, easily navigate their surroundings, and much more. Just like with any area of their body, Treeing Walker Coonhounds can be prone to certain eye health issues.

Treeing Walker Coonhounds have excellent genetics and don’t often inherit health issues compared to some other breeds. When it comes to eye health issues, the most common ones for them to experience are those that come with aging. They are just as likely to experience these conditions as almost any other breed. The most prominent eye health issues to be aware of in Treeing Walker Coonhounds include cataracts and glaucoma.

Glaucoma

This condition is a disease of the eye where the pressure within the eye, called intraocular pressure, is increased. Two types of glaucoma can exist in dogs — primary glaucoma and secondary glaucoma.

Primary glaucoma is when there is increased intraocular pressure in a healthy eye. This occurs due to inherited eye structure abnormalities that affect drainage angle. Some breeds are more likely to get primary glaucoma, and thankfully the Treeing Walker Coonhound is not one of them. This doesn’t mean that they can’t develop glaucoma, despite not typically being genetically predisposed to it.

Secondary glaucoma is not inherited but rather caused by environmental factors. Eye disease or injury can result in a Treeing Walker Coonhound developing secondary glaucoma. Secondary glaucoma is much more common than primary glaucoma. Some causes of secondary glaucoma can include inflammation of the interior of the eye, anterior dislocation of the lens, tumors, intraocular bleeding, and damage to the lens.

Glaucoma comes with high intraocular pressure, which causes damage or degenerative changes to occur within the retina and optic nerve. These can lead to issues regarding the functions of the retina and optic nerve, such as converting images into nerve signals and carrying signals from the retina to the brain.

Be sure to keep an eye out for symptoms of glaucoma, which can include watery discharge from the eye, eye pain, lethargy, appetite loss, eye clouding, eye swelling, and even the possibility of blindness. If you notice any of these symptoms in your Treeing Walker Coonhound, be sure to get them to the vet as soon as possible.

One of the best ways to prevent secondary glaucoma is by avoiding eye injuries, especially when your Treeing Walker Coonhound is hunting. Raccoons can harm your dog and this should be kept in mind when you are using them to track. Glaucoma must be treated by a vet and won’t shorten the life expectancy of your Treeing Walker Coonhound. With proper medical care and lots of love, your Treeing Walker Coonhound can live a healthy and happy life despite this condition.

close up shot of Treeing Walker Coonhound

Cataracts

Cataracts are another common eye health issue for many dogs, including Treeing Walker Coonhounds, to face. This condition can be caused by genetics or by environmental factors such as age and other diseases. Treeing Walker Coonhounds aren’t known to be prone to inheriting cataracts, though they can still be affected by them.

Cataracts can affect the life of your Treeing Walker Coonhound in a variety of ways. They can cloud the entire lens of the eye, making it impossible to distinguish anything in your Treeing Walker Coonhound’s vision besides extreme light and dark. Many Treeing Walker Coonhounds may eventually lose their vision completely due to cataracts.

Thankfully, cataracts develop slowly and aren’t painful. Your Treeing Walker Coonhound will easily be able to adjust to their vision loss. If cataracts become severe, medical intervention can be used to slow the progression of this condition and reduce vision loss symptoms.

Unfortunately, there are minimal ways to prevent cataracts in Treeing Walker Coonhounds. One of the best ways to combat this condition is through regular eye examinations. At routine appointments, your vet will watch for any early signs of cataracts in your Treeing Walker Coonhound. If any develop, they will be able to tell you what measures to take at home to slow this condition progression, and to help you both adjust to these vision changes as they arrive.

Cataracts won’t shorten the life expectancy of your Treeing Walker Coonhound. Thanks to you and your vet, they will be able to live a normal, happy life despite this condition.

Treeing Walker Coonhound Ear Health

All dogs rely heavily on their ears given that hearing is one of their strongest senses. Treeing Walker Coonhounds use their ears to listen for potential prey when hunting, follow commands from their owners, and being aware of their surroundings. Without healthy ears, activities that Treeing Walker Coonhounds love to do, such as hunting, may become a challenge.

Treeing Walker Coonhounds may be more prone to certain ear conditions, such as ear infections, than some other breeds. As always, just because a breed is more prone to a specific condition, doesn’t mean that developing it is inevitable. Many Treeing Walker Coonhounds will go their entire lives without experiencing any ear health issues, including ear infections. Nevertheless, it’s a good idea to know the symptoms of this condition so that if they do arise, you can get your pup the quick medical care that they need.

Ear Infections

Treeing Walker Coonhounds are known for their adorable features, including their floppy ears. With this ear shape can come a price, and that price is often ear infections. Floppy ears can cause a lack of airflow within the Treeing Walker Coonhound ear, which can lead to excess moisture. Ears that are too moist are the perfect breeding ground for unwanted bacteria that cause ear infections.

Ear infections are not an inherited condition but rather they are caused by environmental factors. Ear shape, irregular cleaning, allergies, and excessive swimming can all increase a Treeing Walker Coonhound’s likelihood of developing an ear infection. One or both ears can become infected at anytime.

Because of their moist ears and ear shape, Treeing Walker Coonhounds must get regular ear cleaning. This ear cleaning will help eliminate unwanted bacteria and prevent ear infections.

Aside from ear shape, ear hairs can also cause an infection. These longer hairs can trap debris that leads to an ear infection. When your Treeing Coonhound Walker is groomed, be sure that they are trimming these ear hairs to avoid infections.

Allergies can also cause ear infections. Since Treeing Walker Coonhounds can be prone to food allergies, they may also experience this unfortunate symptom. If you notice that your Treeing Walker Coonhound is developing recurring ear infections despite treatment and preventative measures, it might be a good idea to get them checked for possible allergies.

Symptoms of an ear infection are usually easy to spot for a Treeing Walker Coonhound owner. Dogs that are experiencing an ear infection may shake their head a lot to try and ease the discomfort that they are feeling within their ear. Rubbing their ear with their paw to try and ease discomfort and pain may be another common thing for Treeing Walker Coonhounds to do when they are dealing with an ear infection. Crust on the inside of the ear and the ear opening can be a very obvious sign that your pup is experiencing an ear infection.

Ear infections need to be treated by a vet and won’t shorten the life expectancy of your Treeing Walker Coonhound. As an owner, there are steps that you can take to prevent ear infections. One of the best ways to prevent this condition is through regular ear cleaning. Ear cleaning can be done at home or by a groomer and should be completed regularly.

In addition to ear cleaning, combating allergies can also combat ear infections if these are the cause. Omega-3 fatty acids can help reduce inflammation and minimize symptoms of allergies, including ear infections. If you think that allergies are the cause of ear infections in your Treeing Walker Coonhound, be sure to get these allergies treated by a vet.

If your Treeing Walker Coonhound is an avid swimmer, this may be the cause of their ear infections. Water that gets trapped in their ears may lead to infection-causing bacteria. To avoid ear infections from swimming, be sure to dry the ears of your Treeing Walker Coonhound completely when they are done in the water. Be sure to let them shake out completely to remove any water that you may have missed. With your help, your Treeing Walker Coonhound can easily overcome ear infections.

Treeing Walker Coonhound laying on bed

Treeing Walker Coonhound Immune Health

The immune system is an essential part of a Treeing Walker Coonhound’s overall health. Without a healthy immune system, common viruses, infections, and diseases can become very threatening for your Treeing Walker Coonhound. The last thing that any dog owner wants is for their beloved pup to be at higher risk for developing illnesses because of impaired immune functioning.

Just like any bodily system, the immune system can have problems of its own. The most common immune health issue for both dogs and humans to face is called autoimmune disorders, which occur when the immune system attacks its own body. These disorders can look very different and affect various areas of the body.

All autoimmune disorders cause a decrease in overall immune functioning, putting individuals who have them at a higher risk for developing illnesses. Some breeds are more prone to autoimmune disorders than others, and knowing the ones that are most commonly seen in Treeing Walker Coonhounds can help you get them the medical care that they need if one of these conditions develops. The most common autoimmune disorder for a Treeing Walker Coonhound to experience is called hypothyroidism.

Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism occurs when a Treeing Walker Coonhound’s thyroid glands don’t produce and release enough thyroid hormone into the bloodstream. This production offset is typically due to inflammation or shrinkage of the thyroid gland, which is located in the neck of your Treeing Walker Coonhound. This condition can reduce your Treeing Walker Coonhound’s metabolic state and cause a wide variety of symptoms and health issues.

Hypothyroidism is inherited, meaning that the genes for this condition are passed down from generation to generation. As always, just because a breed is prone to a certain condition because of genetics doesn’t mean that they will always experience it. Many Treeing Walker Coonhounds will go their entire lives without experiencing hypothyroidism or any other autoimmune disorder.

Ear infections and pain, hair loss, flaky skin, and lethargy are all very common symptoms of hypothyroidism. Other symptoms of hypothyroidism in Treeing Walker Coonhounds can include unexplained weight gain, obesity, cold intolerance, lack of energy, and mental dullness. Hypothyroidism causes bodily functions to slow down, which contributes to the development of these symptoms.

Hypothyroidism may impact the life of your Treeing Walker Coonhound with various symptoms, but thankfully it won’t shorten their life expectancy. Treeing Walker Coonhounds with hypothyroidism can live healthy, happy lives alongside their owner despite this serious diagnosis. To improve quality of life, proper treatment for hypothyroidism is important to reduce or eliminate the symptoms that are caused by this condition.

While hypothyroidism needs to be managed by your vet, there are steps that you can take at home to combat this condition. One of the best ways to combat hypothyroidism in Treeing Walker Coonhounds is through diet. Ashwagandha, some mushrooms, kelp, and schizandra berry are known to improve thyroid function naturally. This improved thyroid functioning will help minimize the symptoms that improper thyroid hormone production can cause. These agents can be included in your Treeing Walker Coonhound’s diet through supplementation or specialized foods. They are relatively easy to incorporate and can have some great benefits when used consistently. As always, be sure to consult with your vet before beginning new supplements or making any changes to your Treeing Walker Coonhound’s diet.

While hypothyroidism may seem troubling, it won’t shorten the life expectancy of your Treeing Walker Coonhound. After treatment, all symptoms of this condition will resolve. Some symptoms such as flaky skin and hair thinning may take longer to resolve, but with time they will improve as well. With proper management, your Treeing Walker Coonhound will gain their energy back and be as sharp as ever.

The best way to help your pup adjust to hypothyroidism and live a happy life despite this condition is by sticking to recommended medications and treatments. In doing so, you can eliminate the symptoms of this condition and ensure that your Treeing Walker Coonhound is as healthy as ever. In combination with at-home remedies such as diet, hypothyroidism can easily be managed.

Treeing Walker Coonhound looking up at sky

Joint Health in Treeing Walker Coonhounds

Treeing Walker Coonhounds are extremely active dogs, meaning that they rely heavily on their joints to be able to do the things that they love. Without healthy joints, Treeing Walker Coonhounds may have a hard time running, hunting, playing fetch, and much more.

It’s important to do everything that you can as an owner to ensure that your Treeing Walker Coonhound has healthy joints. Unfortunately, Treeing Walker Coonhounds can be prone to specific joint health issues. This includes patellar luxation and hip dysplasia. As always, just because Treeing Walker Coonhounds are prone to these conditions, doesn’t mean that all of them will experience these.

Patellar Luxation

One of the most common joint health issues for Treeing Walker Coonhounds to experience, patellar luxation, takes place when the kneecap becomes dislocated from the thighbone. This can be caused by traumatic injury to the leg, though it’s usually caused by abnormalities within the joint or limb structures. These structural abnormalities can be inherited, which is what causes Treeing Walker Coonhounds to be more prone to patellar luxation than other breeds. A common patellar luxation abnormality is the groove of the femur being too shallow or the area where the kneecap attaches to the shinbone being displaced. These structural abnormalities cause pressure to be placed on unusual areas of the knee, which leads to patellar luxation.

Patellar luxation can take place in one or both of your Treeing Walker Coonhound’s hind legs, and it can be very uncomfortable and painful for them to experience. If you notice that your pup is avoiding putting weight on one of their hind legs, limping, or holding their leg in an unusual position, this may be due to patellar luxation.

Patellar luxation can vary in severity and necessary treatment. This condition can cause cartilage damage surrounding the joint, which is very painful for your Treeing Walker Coonhound. Extreme pain and dislocation from this condition can lead to increased lameness, impaired mobility, and reduced limb functioning. The most serious way that patellar luxation can impact your hound’s life is through decreased physical abilities and pain. While this condition is serious, it won’t shorten the life expectancy of your pup. With the help of your vet, your Treeing Walker Coonhound can live a normal life despite patellar luxation.

Besides vet prescribed treatments, there are ways that you can help combat patellar luxation at home as a Treeing Walker Coonhound owner. Anti-inflammatory agents such as turmeric, ashwagandha, and kelp can help reduce pain and increase joint functioning. Be sure to consult with your vet before beginning any supplementation or dietary changes.

Weight management is another great way to prevent patellar luxation in Treeing Walker Coonhounds. Preventing your hound from becoming overweight will avoid putting excess pressure on their knee that can lead to patellar luxation. With the help of you and your vet, your Treeing Walker Coonhound will easily overcome this condition.

Treeing Walker Coonhound on a leash

Hip Dysplasia

Aside from patellar luxation, hip dysplasia can also commonly affect Treeing Walker Coonhounds. Hip dysplasia occurs due to abnormal growth in the ball and socket of the hip joint, as well as insufficient joint coverage that can cause damage and pain . This leads to the joint becoming unstable and loose, which can cause scar tissue within the hip joint. This condition can be very painful for a Treeing Walker Coonhound to experience.

Some signs of hip dysplasia include limping, obvious pain, decreased range of motion in hips or legs, audible clicking sounds when your Treeing Walker Coonhound walks, avoiding high levels of activity, and slower rates of walking or running.

Hip dysplasia is an inherited joint condition, which is what causes the Treeing Walker Coonhound to be more likely to experience this compared to some other breeds. Unfortunately, this condition can’t be reversed or prevented, though hip dysplasia symptoms can be managed at home in addition to vet management.

One of the best ways to manage hip dysplasia at home is through diet. Studies have shown that dogs who eat a fish-based, nutrient-rich diet had less severe cases of hip dysplasia than dogs who consumed a chicken-based diet. This shows that some nutrient factors of fish may help slow the progression of hip dysplasia over time. Be sure to check with your vet before making any changes to your dog’s diet.

In addition to fish-based diets, anti-inflammatory agents such as turmeric have also been shown to minimize the pain that hip dysplasia can cause. Consult with your vet before beginning any supplementation.

While hip dysplasia can be painful and problematic, with medical management and at-home remedies, your Treeing Walker Coonhound can live a healthy and happy life despite this condition. Hip dysplasia doesn’t have to slow them down when it comes to doing the things that they love.

Treeing Walker Coonhound Skin and Coat Health

Treeing Walker Coonhounds are known for their unique coats that can closely resemble a beagle. They have beautiful coloring and fur that can protect them from natural elements that they may encounter when hunting or in the field. These coats are treasured by both owners and Treeing Walker Coonhounds for their looks and their durability.

Unfortunately, Treeing Walker Coonhounds can have skin and coat health issues. One of the most common skin and coat health issues for this breed to experience is called pyoderma. While many Treeing Walker Coonhounds will go their entire lives without experiencing this condition, others will develop it, which is why it’s a good idea to know the signs and symptoms.

Treeing Walker Coonhound resting its head on a table

Pyoderma

Pyoderma is a bacterial skin infection that can be caused by a variety of different factors. Some of the most common causes of pyoderma include a break in the skin’s surface, chronic moisture exposure that has damaged the skin, normal skin bacteria that have been changed or altered, impairment of blood flow to the skin, or immune system suppression. In some cases, pyoderma may be caused by skin allergies. Dogs that itch at their skin when experiencing allergies may break the skin surface and in turn, lead to pyoderma.

The most common signs of pyoderma include papules or pustules that form on the skin. These lesions are often red and raised, with a white pus-filled center. Other signs of pyoderma may include circular crusts, dry or flaky skin patches, hair loss, and itching. In short-haired dog breeds, areas of the skin may look like they have hives or moth-eaten patchy hair loss.

Some factors may increase your Treeing Walker Coonhound’s likelihood of developing pyoderma. Fleas, ticks, yeast, or fungal skin infections, thyroid disease or hormonal imbalances, genetics, and some medications that suppress the immune system may increase the odds of a Treeing Walker Coonhound developing this condition. Puppies may often develop pyoderma, which most commonly affects areas with thin hair such as the groin and underarms.

Pyoderma must be diagnosed and treated by a vet. During diagnosis, your vet will examine your Treeing Walker Coonhound’s signs of the condition and their individual medical history. Additional tests, including blood tests to determine if your pup has hypothyroidism, Cushing’s disease, and other endocrine diseases will likely be performed. In addition, skin cytology, skin culture and antibiotic sensitivity tests, and fungal cultures may need to be completed. If allergies seem to have led to the development of pyoderma, allergy tests will likely be performed to identify the allergen that is triggering a reaction.

After an accurate diagnosis, the treatment for pyoderma typically lasts between three to four weeks. In cases where pyoderma is recurrent or chronic, skin cultures and antibiotic sensitivity tests must be performed to ensure that the right medication is being used to treat this condition in your Treeing Walker Coonhound. Your vet will prescribe the correct treatment that best suits your individual dog.

After treatment, you can expect your Treeing Walker Coonhound to make a full recovery. Pyoderma won’t shorten the life expectancy of your Treeing Walker Coonhound, meaning that you can enjoy many years alongside your beloved pooch despite this condition. Once treatment has begun, pyoderma should resolve relatively quickly, though in recurrent cases additional testing may be required.

Though this condition can be hard to prevent, there are some steps that you can take at home as a Treeing Walker Coonhound owner. One of the most promising ways to prevent this condition is by minimizing allergies and scratching. Be sure to keep your hound flea free, address any possible allergies, and bathe them in soothing shampoos. All of these steps can help prevent itching that can lead to the development of pyoderma.

Some of the best shampoos to use to prevent pyoderma include oatmeal, aloe vera, or tea tree oil. All of these agents are known to soothe the skin and reduce inflammation. With the help of you and your vet, your Treeing Walker Coonhound can live a healthy and happy life that is free of pyoderma.