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How to Care for a Biewer Terrier: The Ultimate Guide

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Introduction to the Biewer Terrier

All dog owners have traits that they are looking for when bringing home a dog. Some prefer smaller dogs, some want an active dog, and some want a dog that doesn’t shed much. There are many important things to consider when adding a new canine family member to your home.

For owners that are looking for a small, affectionate, and energetic dog, Biewers may be the perfect fit. These adorable little pups are great with apartment living and novice dog owners. Weighing 4-to-8- pounds, and with a maximum height of 11 inches, this pooch is perfect for those who want a little one to snuggle up in their lap or accompany them on daily tasks. Biewers are known for their adaptability and will do well in a large home or an apartment.

Biewers aren’t too sensitive, meaning that they can live in a house with a lot of commotion. They also don’t mind being left alone, though leaving them for a large portion of the day every day isn’t ideal for a Biewer Terrier puppy or adult. Biewers do tend to get cold easily, so putting them in a sweater or other warm clothes during the winter months is typically a good idea. Your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult also doesn’t mind the heat to an extent, but be sure to have a bowl of water accessible to them during these warm summer months.

Biewers are highly active dogs and love to play, run, and follow you around your home. They do need a little bit of daily exercise, though, given their small size, a short walk usually is just enough for them. While Biewers are energetic dogs, they know when to reel it in. They typically go through life somewhat subdued and aren’t as intense with their high energy level as other breeds may be.

Since Biewers are such playful dogs, they do well in a house with someone to play with. Homes with kids, other dogs, or an adult that can be their playmates are ideal. Biewers love to spend time every day playing fetch, running around, or even roughhousing. Having young children in your home shouldn’t stop you from adopting a Biewer Terrier, though both will need to be taught how to be gentle with one another. Once this is done, they are sure to be the best of friends.

Biewers are known to be very vocal dogs who can be a bit standoffish when it comes to strangers. Socializing them from a young age can help them be warmer to humans that they don’t know, and they can also be trained to be great watchdogs. If you are looking for a dog to keep watch over your home and family and warn you of any potential intruders, a Biewer Terrier puppy or adult may be the dog for you.

Biewers are pretty smart dogs who are relatively easy to train. They can have a streak of stubbornness, but with some consistency and reward, they are sure to become very obedient. With their intelligence and high energy level, some Biewers make great dogs for agility training. One great thing about Biewers is that they have a low prey drive and potential for wanderlust. Because of this, they are less likely to nip and will stick right by you rather than wander off.

Biewers are known for their long coats, and they do require brushing to avoid tangled and matted hair. They are considered hypoallergenic and don’t shed much, if at all, making them the perfect addition to a home that has a member with a dog allergy. If you choose to shorten their coat, they will not need much grooming. Grooming can typically be performed at home by a knowledgeable individual in this area or by a professional.

Biewers can gain weight rather easily. To maintain an ideal weight, be sure to feed your Biewer Terrier the recommended amount of daily food. Adequate exercise is also the key to avoiding any weight gain in your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult. By keeping them at a healthy weight, you will also prevent health problems that are associated with an overweight or obese dog.

Biewers are a generally very healthy breed, though, like any dog, they can still be prone to certain health conditions. Knowing these common conditions and how to treat them can help ensure that your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult is as healthy as it can be.

History of the Biewer Terrier

The Biewer’s history is very straightforward, as it typically is with pure-breed dogs such as these. Biewers are even named after the individuals that created this breed. In Hanstruck, Germany on January 20, 1984, the first Biewer Terrier is believed to have been born. This can all be credited to Gertrud and Werner Biewer.

Gertrud and Werner Biewer were passionate lovers of the breed that the Biewer Terrier descended from, the Yorkshire Terrier. They were able to create this new Biewer Terrier breed by crossing Yorkshire Terriers that had the recessive piebald gene that their Yorkshire Terriers inherited. This gene gives a dog white markings, which is what sets Biewers apart from their Yorkshire Terrier cousin. These genes allow Biewers to become a tri-color dog that many know and love today.

Werner Biewer initially attempted to get his new breed recognized, but it was rejected for being the wrong color. Many clubs stated that these dogs weren’t able to be reproduced successfully to be recognized as their own breed. Werner Biewer was unhappy with this decision and he didn’t let this rejection stop him as he continued on his attempt to get his breed recognized as its own. After some time and searching, he was able to get the Biewer Terrier accepted by the ACH (Allgemeiner Club der Hundefreunde Deutschland e.V.) in which they were named the Biewer Terrier a’ la Pom Pon. The French term “a’ la Pom Pon” means a tassel or ball of colorful yarn, which many believe perfectly describes the Biewer Terrier appearance. This term was coined by the husband of singer Margot Eskens when he presented her with a Biewer Terrier puppy as a gift.

After the recognition of the Biewer Terrier breed, their popularity in Germany became significantly high. Many began to attempt to recreate this breed throughout the country, though Werner Biewer kept a close eye on those trying to continue his breed. He kept offspring high quality and genuine, which made them very costly and hard to come by. After he died in 1997, many began taking shortcuts when producing a Biewer puppy. By 2000, their popularity in Germany had decreased significantly.

A few years after their popularity declined in Germany, Biewers were introduced in the United States. People took a great liking to these unique dogs and they became well-known and loved in their new American home. By 2014, the American Kennel Club recognized the Biewer Terrier as their own distinguished breed. Seven years later, in 2021, the Biewer Terrier was recognized by the American Kennel Club as a full, pure-breed member of the Toy dog group. This is how modern-day Biewers descended from the Yorkshire Terrier and made their way into the hearts and homes of so many. Thanks to Werner Biewer and his commitment to these dogs, we are all able to enjoy this unique breed.

biewer terrier with red bow

Biewer Terrier Intelligence

The Biewer Terrier is a fairly intelligent breed, especially given the Terrier breed group’s history of hunting. Terriers have commonly been used for hunting small game and have been known to have a strong prey drive and digging tendencies, though these traits seem not to have been passed down to Biewers. Although they don’t have these strong instincts, Biewers are still just as smart as other terriers.

While smart dogs are typically known for being easy to train, this task can be slightly more difficult with Biewers. These loveable pooches can be known for their stubbornness, which can make the training process for Biewers a bit more challenging. Sometimes they just simply might not want to listen to what you want them to do.

If you find yourself with a stubborn Biewer Terrier puppy or adult that you are trying to train, it’s important to be consistent and patient. Biewers respond better to positive reinforcement than they do to harsh words or actions when training. Pets, praise, and treats are the best way to motivate your Biewer Terrier when trying to teach them new commands. Try to avoid punishing them when they don’t perform the way that you want them to, and instead focus on times when they do what you are asking of them.

With persistence and reward, your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult is sure to be as obedient as ever. They are sure to sit, lay down, and roll over in no time with the right training approach.

Biewer Terrier Cognitive Health

With an intelligent dog such as a Biewer Terrier puppy or adult, cognitive health is especially important. Cognitive functioning allows your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult to use their intelligence and do the things that they love, follow commands, and abide by household rules. Without cognitive health, they may have a more difficult time navigating day-to-day life despite their natural intelligence level. This is because impaired cognitive functioning makes tasks such as problem-solving, remembering various things, and making sense of your surroundings extremely difficult.

Unfortunately, as dogs age, they too are susceptible to cognitive impairment, just like humans. Canine cognitive dysfunction, also known as canine dementia, is the most common cognitive health issue for a dog to face. This is an important condition to keep an eye out for to ensure your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult is living its best life possible. Aging Biewers can still live active, healthy lives by your side as you try to prevent and combat canine dementia.

Canine Dementia

Canine dementia is a cognitive functioning condition that affects the life of your Biewer Terrier in a few different ways. This condition won’t affect a Biewer Terrier puppy since it is caused by components of the aging process itself. Because of this, canine dementia is most commonly seen in Biewer Terriers that are nine years old or older, and females that are spayed. Compared to other breeds, Biewers are not more prone to canine dementia. This condition isn’t inherited and can affect any breed of dog.

Canine dementia is caused by an occurrence of plaque buildup in the brain. This plaque buildup is due to the presence of abnormal proteins. Nerve damage occurs due to this plaque buildup, which results in an impairment of cognitive functioning, known as canine dementia. Typically this nerve damage happens over time, which leads to a slow onset of symptoms.

Slow onset of symptoms can cause canine dementia to go unnoticed quite often. These symptoms may be written off as typical aging behaviors, or they may occur at different times, making it hard to recognize that they are related to one another. In some cases, a Biewer Terrier with canine dementia may be experiencing other health conditions, such as arthritis, diabetes, cancer, and more. Because of this, canine dementia symptoms may be blamed on an unrelated condition, which makes obtaining an accurate diagnosis for this cognitive condition more difficult.

Knowing the symptoms of canine dementia is the best way to help your Biewer Terrier obtain an accurate diagnosis and treatment if this condition does develop. One of the most common symptoms of canine dementia in Biewers is memory loss. A Biewer Terrier who is experiencing canine dementia may forget previously learned tricks, such as sitting or rolling over, or common household rules that they previously abided by.

In addition to memory loss, canine dementia may also cause motor skill impairment. Biewers with canine dementia may have a more difficult time when catching a treat that you have thrown at them or jumping into a car. They may also have a difficult time finding a toy or treat that they have dropped. If you notice any of these symptoms in your Biewer Terrier, be sure to get them checked by a vet.

Unfortunately, there are no ways to reverse this condition once it has begun to develop, though there are ways you can prevent it as an owner. One of the most promising ways to prevent canine dementia in your Biewer Terrier is through mental stimulation. Stimulating toys such as puzzle toys and feeder bowls can help prevent your dog from becoming bored and keep their cognitive functioning in tip-top shape as they grow older. These toys keep your dog engaged and make them solve problems in order to reach a treat or kibble, and can typically be found at your local pet store.

Diet is another very promising way to prevent and combat cognitive decline in Biewers. Omega-3 fatty acids and various antioxidants are commonly included in senior dog foods and various supplements, which are shown to improve brain function. These agents can be given to your Biewer Terrier puppy to help prevent canine dementia, or to your older Biewer Terrier to help combat symptoms and slow progression of this condition. Be sure to consult with your vet before beginning supplementation.

While canine dementia can impact your Biewer Terrier, with your help, they can still live a fulfilling life despite cognitive impairment.

biewer terrier running through grass field

Biewer Terrier Stress

Just like humans, all dog breeds, including the Biewer Terrier, are going to experience stress at least once in their life. This stress can be caused by a wide variety of things that can depend on your dog’s history, age, breed, and much more. No human or dog wants to experience a high amount of stress in their life, which is why it’s important to minimize this experience as much as you can. In doing so, you and your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult will live a much happier life together.

Knowing the common causes of stress for your Biewer Terrier is one of the best ways to minimize it. In addition, knowing the stress relief strategies that work for them will help them overcome stress when it does become triggered. This can take some time and practice, but with determination and trial and error, you can provide a low-stress life for your Biewer Terrier.

Stress Can Differ in All Dogs

SIgnals of stress can depend on the specific dog, though there are some common ones to look out for as a Biewer Terrier owner. One of the most common signals of stress in a Biewer Terrier puppy or adult is pacing and restlessness. If your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult continuously does laps around your coffee table or backyard, it may be because they are feeling stressed.

In addition to pacing and restlessness, whining and barking is another common signal of stress in all dogs, including Biewers. A Biewer that doesn’t need to use the restroom may be whining because something in their environment is causing them stress.

Finally, posture and dog body language are big indicators of various feelings, including stress. A stressed Biewer Terrier puppy or adult may cower down or hide from others. In addition, the ears of a stressed dog typically face down and backward. If you notice any of these body language changes, your Biewer Terrier may be experiencing stress for some reason.

Once you are familiar with common signals of stress in your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult, identifying what causes the stress is the next step in minimizing it. Try to take note of what happens right before your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult begins to show signs of stress. The most common causes of stress for a Biewer Terrier puppy or adult are lack of stimulation and new places, people, or dogs.

A lack of stimulation and boredom can easily lead to stress for your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult. They may be in a constant state of looking for something to do. If your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult begins to pace and whine when they don’t have a stimulating toy to keep them busy, lack of stimulation may be the root of their stress. Typically, stimulating them one way or another will resolve this feeling. Daily walks, trips to the dog park, and engaging toys are easy ways to keep your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult from getting bored. If you don’t have time to go for a quick walk, consider giving your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult a new puzzle toy. Even just a quick lap around the block can be a good way to keep your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult from becoming stressed about their boredom. Whatever activity it is you choose to stimulate them, your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult will be more than happy and stress free.

If you notice that your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult shows signs of stress, such as whining or hiding, in new places or with new dogs or people, these unknown factors may be their trigger of stress. Dog parks are overall a fun experience, though strangers may be intimidating and stressful for Biewers.

To avoid stress from new places, people, or dogs, be sure to socialize your Biewer Terrier puppy from a young age. Socializing them will help them become less fearful of these unknown situations when they are in a safe environment, which will normalize meeting new people and dogs. If you have adopted an older Biewer Terrier, they can still be socialized slowly despite not being a puppy. In addition, socialization will help stimulate your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult. With socialization, you will reduce the likelihood of your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult experiencing stress from either boredom or unknown situations. This will help you ensure that your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult is living a low-stress life.

Biewer Terrier Anxiety

While stress is a concern when it comes to your Biewer Terrier’s well-being, so is anxiety. Anxiety can affect any dog at any age, and like stress, it can be triggered by a variety of factors.

Anxiety can greatly impact your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult. It can make them feel distressed, uneasy, and nervous, which causes them not to enjoy their day or the things that they are doing. When experiencing anxiety, Biewers may look for ways to cope with this feeling that affects their health in various ways. A Biewer Terrier puppy or adult may begin to bite and chew at their skin when feeling anxious. This can cause hot spots and fur loss, as well as overall poor skin health. Biewers are known for their beautiful and unique fur, and the last thing any owner wants is to see their coats damaged because of stress.

An anxious Biewer Terrier puppy or adult may also eat less than usual and have a loss of appetite. This lack of eating can lead to unwanted weight loss and other health issues. If you notice that your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult is eating less than usual and showing signs of anxiety, be sure to get them to a vet as soon as possible.

Signs of anxiety in Biewers are very similar to signs of stress. For example, a stressed Biewer Terrier puppy or adult may whine or bark more than usual. They may pace and show signs of restlessness, as well as have changes in their posture and body language.

When feeling anxious, Biewers may find ways to cope that are considered inappropriate. Shoes and furniture may become victims of chewing when a Biewer Terrier puppy or adult is experiencing anxiety. When Biewers chew inappropriate items, they are likely to get disciplined for this. Getting disciplined for trying to ease their anxiety can cause them to feel even more anxious, leading to a never-ending cycle. This can negatively impact their quality of life and highlights why dealing with Biewer Terrier anxiety in the best, most prompt way possible is very important.

Stimulation is one of the best ways to avoid anxiety in Biewers. This stimulation serves as an outlet for anxious energy and keeps Biewers focused on activities that they enjoy, rather than possible anxiety triggers in their environment. Walks, socializing, feeder bowls, and puzzle toys are all great ways to keep your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult stimulated and avoid possible anxiety.

biewer terrier looking up at sky

Biewer Terrier Separation Anxiety

One of the most common causes of anxiety in Biewers is being away from their owners, which is known as separation anxiety. Biewers commonly develop separation anxiety because they are very affectionate dogs and form such strong bonds with their owners. Having an absent owner causes them to feel anxious about being apart and a strong desire to find a way to be near you again.

The best way to avoid separation anxiety in Biewers is to ensure that they are socialized from an early age. This socialization allows them to become less fearful about different situations because they have already been introduced to them in a safe and trusting environment.

Biewers who have not been socialized from an early age are more prone to separation anxiety. If you have adopted a young Biewer Terrier puppy this should be an easy task, but if you have adopted an older Biewer Terrier, they may have already developed this separation anxiety due to a lack of socializing. If this is the case with your Biewer Terrier, there are still ways that you can help combat their separation anxiety.

Many supplements are on the market for canine separation anxiety which has been shown to naturally minimize this condition. Some supplements used for canine anxiety may include CBD, a naturally calming compound. These CBD-based supplements are rising in popularity and can typically be found at your local pet store. Always consult with your vet before adding supplements to your dog’s diet.

In addition to supplements, crate training is another promising way to avoid separation anxiety in a Biewer Terrier puppy or adult. Crate training shows your Biewer Terrier that they have a safe place meant just for them. Being in this safe space when you are away may make them feel less anxious about being alone. To do so, place your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult into their crate and say the word “crate” while they are inside of it. Be sure not to lock them inside of it until they feel comfortable while in their crate so that it doesn’t become a negative experience for them.

Biewer Terrier Allergies

Allergies can affect a wide variety of dogs, including Biewers. Allergies look very different in dogs than they do in humans, and they can affect their life in a variety of ways. While humans typically have a runny nose, sneezing, watery eyes, and even hives when experiencing allergies, dogs typically see allergy symptoms in their skin. They typically become itchy, have irritated skin, and possible ear infections.

Biewers can experience various types of allergies. Flea allergies, food allergies, and skin allergies caused by environmental factors can affect dogs. Some breeds are more prone to a certain type of allergies than others. For Biewers, the most common type of allergy to experience is skin allergies.

Skin Allergies

Skin allergies are triggered by environmental factors. These environmental factors, known as allergens, usually are harmless by nature. They may be grass, dust, or even pollen. A Biewer Terrier puppy or adult with skin allergies has a hyperactive immune system. Their hyperactive immune system views these allergens as threats and begins to attack them, triggering an allergic reaction. Because there are so many different possible allergens, pinpointing the exact one that is causing your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult to have reactions can be difficult. Allergy testing is usually advised and must be done by a veterinary professional to identify treatment options.

Keeping an eye out for common skin allergy symptoms is the best way to get your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult prompt care if they do develop this condition. One of the most common skin allergy symptoms is excessive itching and scratching. When experiencing skin allergies, Biewers may feel like they have an itch, or many, that can never fully be relieved. Biewers with skin allergies may lick at their paws or rub various itchy areas of their body on furniture and walls. The most common areas for a dog to become itchy due to skin allergies are on their legs, paws, and hind end, though skin allergies can affect any part of their body.

In addition to skin problems, allergies can also cause ear infections. A Biewer Terrier with environmental skin allergies may experience recurrent ear infections that go away even after being treated by a vet. If this is the case with your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult, consider having them checked by a vet for skin allergies.

While skin allergies can impact the life of your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult, they won’t shorten their life expectancy. Biewers who are experiencing this condition can still go on to live a healthy, happy life after treatment. You can look forward to many fun-filled years together alongside your Biewer despite skin allergies.

Diagnosing and treatment for skin allergies in Biewers must be done by a vet. In doing so, they will perform an allergy test to identify what is triggering these reactions. Once this is complete, an appropriate treatment plan specific for your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult will be decided by your vet.

Though medical treatment is necessary, you can help combat skin allergy symptoms at home in a few different ways. One of the best ways to minimize skin allergy symptoms in your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult is through diet.

Omega-3 fatty acids have shown to be a good way to combat Biewer Terrier skin allergies. These fatty acids reduce skin inflammation, which leads to minimized or eliminated skin allergy symptoms. Omega-3 fatty acids are relatively simple to add to the diet of your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult. Specialized foods, various supplements, and even fish oil pills contain an abundance of omega-3 fatty acids. Be sure to check with your vet before beginning any new supplements or dietary changes.

In addition to diet, specialized shampoos can help combat skin allergies in your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult. Shampoos that contain aloe vera, oatmeal, or tea tree oil have been shown to soothe the skin, reduce dry skin, and minimize itching and irritation. These shampoos have been specially formulated for dogs with skin problems and can be typically found at your local pet store. Be sure to follow recommended bathing schedules as excessive bathing can also cause skin problems.

While skin allergies can be concerning, with the help of your vet and at-home remedies, your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult can live a healthy, normal life despite skin allergies.

biewer terrier laying on couch

 

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Biewer Terrier Gut Health

Gut health is an extremely important component of overall health when it comes to Biewers. A large portion of the immune system exists inside of the gut, meaning that if their gut isn’t healthy, the immune system may be impaired. When the immune system is impaired, your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult is susceptible to catching common viruses, infections, and diseases.

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There are a variety of different gut health issues that dogs can experience. Some breeds may be more prone to certain gut health conditions than others. Knowing the common conditions that affect Biewers is the best way to catch them early and get the prompt medical care that they need, helping them to get back to healthy and happy as quickly as possible. For Biewers, one of the most important to watch out for is canine parvovirus.

Canine Parvovirus

Canine parvovirus, more commonly known as parvo, is an intestinal and stomach condition that affects a Biewer puppy or unvaccinated adult. This condition is very serious and can be fatal if left untreated. While Biewers can be prone to experiencing gut health issues such as canine parvovirus, this doesn’t mean that these conditions are inevitable. Many Biewers will go their entire lives without experiencing parvo or any other gut health issues.

Nevertheless, it’s a good idea to know the signs and symptoms of this condition in case it does arise. Canine parvovirus infects the small intestine, destroying cells, impairing absorption, and disrupting the gut barrier. Some of the most common symptoms of parvo include vomiting, lethargy, diarrhea, fever, not drinking or eating, weakness, and dehydration. If you notice any of these symptoms in your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult, be sure to get them to the vet as soon as possible. Prompt treatment is the key to helping your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult overcome parvo.

This virus is highly contagious, especially for a Biewer Terrier puppy that hasn’t been fully vaccinated yet. A Biewer Terrier that is between six and sixteen weeks of age is the most at risk for developing parvo. Before six weeks old, a Biewer Terrier puppy still has the antibodies from their mom that protect them from contracting parvo. Vaccines for parvo are given at 6, 8, 12, and 16 weeks. After these vaccines have been completed, your Biewer Terrier puppy is protected from this virus.

Canine parvovirus can be transmitted directly or indirectly from one dog to your Biewer Terrier puppy. If your Biewer puppy comes into contact with an infected dog or a contaminated object, they will likely develop parvo. Parvo can survive indoors for at least one month, and outdoors for many months or even up to a year under certain conditions. Dogs that are infected with parvo remain contagious for up to ten days, and five of these days can be before any symptoms show.

One of the best ways to decrease the chance of your Biewer Terrier contracting canine parvovirus is by avoiding public places. Dog parks, pet stores, and other places where dogs congregate are potential sources of parvo and should be avoided until your Biewer Terrier puppy is fully vaccinated against this condition, and your vet says it’s okay to take them out.

While socialization is important for puppies, socializing your Biewer Terrier puppy in public spaces, like parks and neighborhoods, should be avoided until after they have received all of their vaccines. In addition, ensuring that all other dogs in your household are fully vaccinated is necessary when it comes to preventing your Biewer Terrier puppy from contracting this life-threatening virus. If your Biewer Terrier puppy goes to doggy daycare, be sure to double-check with this location that they only allow fully vaccinated dogs.

When it comes to overcoming canine parvovirus, prompt medical treatment is key. Be sure to keep an eye out for symptoms of parvo and to seek immediate medical care if they arise in your Biewer Terrier puppy. Without treatment, 92% of dogs do not survive parvo, though, with treatment, about 68%-92% of dogs can overcome parvo. Most puppies that survive the first three to four days of parvo treatment make a complete recovery. Once recovered, a Biewer Terrier puppy who has had parvo will still have a full life expectancy.

While this condition can be scary for any Biewer Terrier owner, watchfulness and prompt medical care are the key to overcoming this. With an education of what parvo is and a careful owner, Biewers stand a good chance against this very serious virus.

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Biewer Terrier Eye Health

Biewers rely on their eyes for a lot of different activities, such as playing, eating, and much more. This breed is highly alert and loves to watch what its owners are doing. To do all of these things, Biewers need to have healthy eyes and vision.

Just like any body part, the eyes of Biewers can have issues of their own. All dogs are more prone to certain eye conditions than others, though not all will experience them. Many Biewers will go their entire lives without experiencing any eye health issues. Despite this, it’s a good idea for a Biewer Terrier owner to know the common eye health issues that they face. Progressive retinal atrophy is the most common eye health issue for this breed to experience.

biewer terrier sitting on blue rug

Progressive Retinal Atrophy

Progressive retinal atrophy is a condition where a dog’s eyes are genetically programmed to slowly go blind with age. Unfortunately, all dogs with this condition will lose their vision completely, though the process isn’t painful for the dog experiencing it. Progressive retinal atrophy is inherited, meaning that it is passed down to a Biewer Terrier puppy from older generations.

Progressive retinal atrophy can’t be cured or reversed, though Biewers with this condition can still live very happy and fulfilling lives. Biewers with this condition won’t lose their vision until later in their life, and the process is slow. Because of this, they are easily able to adjust to their vision loss and can still do almost all of the things that they love. While progressive retinal atrophy is serious, it won’t shorten the life expectancy of your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult.

The typical initial symptoms of progressive retinal atrophy are dilated pupils and increased difficulty seeing at night. Both of these symptoms typically begin around three or five years of age, though they can occur later or earlier. If you are curious if your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult has this condition, genetic testing can be performed to determine a diagnosis before symptoms begin to show. This will allow you more time to adjust to this diagnosis and prepare your home for when vision loss does begin.

Once a Biewer Terrier has lost their vision completely due to progressive retinal atrophy, they can still do many activities that they used to when they had full vision. Blind Biewers can still play and navigate their home by memory. They can recognize owners and other animals by their scent, as well as locate their food bowl. Blind Biewers can even roughhouse and explore, thanks to their strong nose.

A blind Biewer Terrier puppy or adult with progressive retinal atrophy will still be able to navigate their home. They will memorize the layout of their surroundings and adjust their paths accordingly. One of the best ways to help your Biewer Terrier adjust to vision loss is by showing the changes in your home’s layout. If you move furniture, be sure to safely show your Biewer Terrier this new layout so that they don’t run into anything. Once you do so, they will be sure to go around this new item in their way and to adjust previously memorized paths of travel.

Since progressive retinal atrophy is inherited, unfortunately, there’s nothing a Biewer Terrier puppy or adult owner can do to prevent it. The best way to manage this condition is through early diagnosis, which is why it’s so important to keep up to date on routine vet examinations.

During these examinations, your vet will look for possible signs of progressive retinal atrophy and check up on their overall eye and vision health.

If you notice symptoms of progressive retinal atrophy, it’s best to discuss this condition with your vet as soon as possible. The earlier you obtain a diagnosis, the more time you will have to adjust as a Biewer Terrier owner. While this condition may seem scary, you and your Biewer Terrier can still live a happy, normal life together after diagnosis. With the help of your vet and medical care, as well as some various adjustments at home, your Biewer Terrier is sure to do all of the things that they love despite vision loss that is caused by progressive retinal atrophy.

 Eye Supplements We Love

Biewer Terrier Ear Health

Biewers rely on their ears for a variety of things, as well as their eyes. They use their ears to hear possible predators when out and about, listen to commands, and much more. When unhealthy, ears can become a painful problem for Biewers. The last thing that any dog owner wants is for their pup to be uncomfortable or in pain from a health condition.

Biewers are known for their adorable, pointy ears that stick out from their beautiful fur. With this loveable ear shape can come some possible health issues that Biewers may be prone to. Knowing these conditions and their symptoms is the best way to ensure that your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult gets prompt medical care if needed. As always, just because a dog is prone to a certain condition, doesn’t mean that they are destined to experience it. Many Biewers will go their entire lives without experiencing any ear health issues. If they do experience any, the most common ear health issue to develop is ear infections.

Biewer Terrier Ear Infections

Ear infections can be caused by a wide variety of factors. These can include debris, a lack of ear cleaning, swimming, and even skin allergies. Because of long ear hairs and pointy ear shape, Biewers are most likely to develop ear infections from bacteria and debris. This bacteria and debris can get caught in these long ear hairs or within the ear itself.

In addition to debris, the skin allergies that Biewers are prone to can also cause ear infections. If you notice that your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult continues to have ear infections even after treatment, this may be because they are caused by skin allergies. Be sure to discuss this with your vet so that they can choose an appropriate treatment method for your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult.

Flea waste can be another potential cause of ear infections in Biewers. This highlights the importance of keeping your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult dog flea-free. Fleas can be eliminated through drops and pills sold at the pet store, as well as with prescribed medications. Be sure to consult with your vet before beginning any flea medications from the pet store.

Ear infections can develop in one or both ears. They may develop at different times or at the same time, and they may occur more than once in the same ear. One of the most common symptoms of an ear infection in Biewers is crust developing in and around the affected ear. In addition, Biewers with an ear infection may shake their head often, lean to the side of their affected ear, and rub the affected ear with their paw. All of these behaviors are an attempt to ease the pain and discomfort that they are feeling from their infection. If your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult whines, grunts, or even yelps when you touch their ear, this may be a sign that they are experiencing an ear infection.

While ear infections do need medical treatment to resolve them, there are steps that you can take at home to reduce the chance of your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult developing an ear infection. Regular ear cleaning is one of the most promising ways to prevent ear infections in Biewers. Though groomers will perform ear cleaning, it’s a good idea to keep up in between grooming appointments. In addition, trimming long ear hairs can prevent debris trapping that can lead to ear infections. This will also be done at your Biewer Terrier’s grooming appointments but should be checked in between grooming sessions.

In addition to ear cleaning, diet is a promising way to prevent ear infections in Biewers. Since ear infections may be caused by the skin allergies that Biewers are prone to, keeping their skin healthy is a good way to prevent these infections.

Feeding your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult a diet that is rich in antioxidants and omega-3 fatty acids will help keep their skin healthy and combat the skin allergies that can cause ear infections. Omega-3 fatty acid supplements are a great thing to incorporate into the diet of your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult to prevent possible allergy-related ear infections in the future. As always, be sure to consult your vet before beginning any new supplements.

While ear infections can be painful and unenjoyable for your Biewer Terrier, this condition can be resolved. With veterinary care and prevention remedies, you can avoid these infections and keep your dog’s ears as healthy as possible.

biewer terrier running on gravel path

Ear Cleaning Solutions We Love

  1. VetWELL Ear Cleaner for Dogs and Cats - Otic Rinse for Infections and Controlling Ear Infections and Odor in Pets - 8 oz (Cucumber Melon)
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    10/04/2022 12:11 am GMT
  3. Virbac Epi-Otic Advanced Ear Cleanser for Dogs & Cats, 8 oz
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    10/04/2022 12:04 am GMT
  5. Nutri-Vet Ear Cleanse for Dogs | Cleans & Deodorizes | 8 Ounces
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    10/04/2022 12:08 am GMT

Biewer Terrier Immune Health

When it comes to the overall health of your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult, one of the most important components is immune health. Immune health allows your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult to fight off common viruses, infections, and diseases. Without a healthy immune system, these illnesses could become very dangerous and even deadly for Biewers.

As with any bodily system, the immune system can have problems of its own. These issues are known as autoimmune disorders, and they occur when the immune system attacks its own body. These disorders can manifest in a wide variety of ways. They can affect different bodily systems and functions, and cause different types of symptoms. Some disorders attack organs, others attack the skin, and some may attack specific functions.

Some dogs are more prone to certain autoimmune disorders than others, while some may never experience any autoimmune disorders at all. For Biewers, the most common autoimmune disorder to experience is called hypothyroidism. As always, just because a breed is prone to a specific condition, doesn’t mean they are destined to experience it. Many Biewers will go their entire lives without ever experiencing hypothyroidism or any other autoimmune disorder.

Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism is an autoimmune disorder that occurs when a Biewer Terrier’s thyroid gland doesn’t produce and release enough thyroid hormone into the bloodstream. This lack of production and release is usually caused by inflammation or shrinkage of the thyroid gland, which is located in the neck of your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult. Because of this lack of thyroid hormone, the metabolic state of Biewers is typically affected the most when experiencing hypothyroidism.

Thankfully, hypothyroidism won’t shorten the life expectancy of your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult. Though when left untreated, hypothyroidism can impact your Biewer Terrier’s life in a variety of different ways. Your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult may not enjoy going on walks or playing as much as they used to because of the lethargy that hypothyroidism causes. When living in a cold climate, Biewers with hypothyroidism may not enjoy being outside because of the cold intolerance that this condition causes. These impacts highlight why it is so important to seek proper medical care if you notice your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult experiencing any hypothyroidism symptoms.

Some of the most common symptoms seen in Biewers with hypothyroidism include flaky skin, hair thinning, ear infections, and lethargy. Other symptoms of hypothyroidism may include obesity, unexplained weight gain, lack of energy, and mental dullness. If you notice that your Biewer Terrier puppy has hair and skin issues that aren’t related to skin allergies, consider getting them checked for hypothyroidism. If you notice any of these common hypothyroidism symptoms in your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult, be sure to get them immediate medical care.

Once diagnosed, hypothyroidism can easily be managed by your vet and your Biewer Terrier will be back to healthy and happy in no time. After treatment, some symptoms such as hair loss and flaky skin may take slightly longer to resolve. After a few weeks of treatment, these symptoms are sure to be reduced greatly or even disappear.

Unfortunately, since hypothyroidism is an inherited condition, there are not a lot of ways to prevent it. While it can’t be avoided, there are ways that you can help manage hypothyroidism in Biewers at home. Diet and supplementation are promising ways to manage thyroid functioning and hypothyroidism symptoms in Biewers.

Some mushrooms, kelp, Ashwagandha, and schizandra berry are all known to naturally improve thyroid functioning. By supporting thyroid functioning through diet, you can help balance out thyroid hormone levels in your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult and minimize hypothyroidism symptoms. These agents can easily be added to the diet of your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult through special foods and supplements, both of which can be found at your local pet store. Be sure to consult with your vet before beginning any diet changes or supplementation.

While hypothyroidism in Biewers may seem intimidating, Biewers can still live a normal and healthy life despite this condition. With veterinary care and natural remedies, Biewers can experience little to no hypothyroidism symptoms even after diagnosis. Sticking with a recommended medication schedule, ensuring that your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult is doing the things that they love, and using thyroid-supporting dietary agents are all great ways to help your Biewer Terrier overcome this condition.

Immune Health Options We Love

Biewer Terrier Joint Health

What is a Biewer Terrier like? Biewers are active and adorable dogs, meaning that they need healthy joints to allow them to do all of the things that they love. Without healthy joints, Biewers are unable to run, jump, play, and participate in other active tasks. Unfortunately, Biewers can be prone to various joint health issues. While none of these joint health conditions are fatal, they can impact the life of your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult.

Knowing the symptoms of the joint health conditions that Biewers are most likely to face is very important. In doing so, you will be able to identify these conditions if they arise and get your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult the prompt medical care that they need.

As always, just because a breed is prone to certain health problems does not mean they are destined to experience them. Many Biewers will never experience any form of joint pain or problems. It’s still a good idea to know about the most common joint health issues that affect Biewers, which are called patellar luxation and Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease.

biewer terrier with tail up in the air

Patellar Luxation

Patellar luxation occurs when a Biewer Terrier’s kneecap becomes dislocated from their thighbone, which causes mobility issues and discomfort.

This can occur in one or both of a Biewer Terrier’s hind legs. Whether in one or both legs, it is very painful and uncomfortable for Biewers to experience. This dislocation is most commonly caused by an abnormality within the joint or limb structures.

Common joint abnormalities that cause patellar luxation are the groove of the femur being too shallow or the area where the kneecap attaches to the shinbone being displaced. These structural abnormalities cause pressure to be placed on unusual areas of the knee, which leads to patellar luxation. Because these structural abnormalities can be inherited, Biewer Terriers can be more prone to patellar luxation than some other breeds.

Patellar luxation can cause cartilage damage in the affected knee joint, which is extremely painful for Biewers. This condition and the damage that it causes can lead to lameness, reduced limb functioning, and impaired mobility. While patellar luxation can impact Biewers in a wide variety of ways, the most serious ones are decreased physical abilities and severe pain.

If you notice your Biewer Terrier limping, holding their leg in an abnormal position, or avoiding putting weight on their leg, this may be due to patellar luxation. Patellar luxation can vary greatly in severity and the way that it is treated. In some cases, management strategies may be needed, while in others when the dislocation is recurring, surgery may be the best option. The right treatment for your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult will be decided on a case-by-case basis. While this condition is serious, it won’t shorten the life expectancy of your Biewer Terrier.

While vet intervention is required for Biewers with patellar luxation, there are some things that you can do at home to help combat this condition. Anti-inflammatory agents such as turmeric, kelp, and ashwagandha can help reduce pain and increase joint functioning. These agents can easily be added to your dog’s diet through food and supplements. Be sure to consult with your vet before beginning supplementation or dietary changes.

Weight management is another effective method to prevent patellar luxation in Biewers. One of the best ways to keep your Biewer Terrier at a healthy weight is by ensuring that they exercise regularly and avoid excessive eating. Keeping Biewers from becoming overweight will avoid excess pressure on their knees that can lead to patellar luxation. When it comes to patellar luxation, be sure to consult with your vet to come up with prevention and treatment strategies that will work for you and your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult.

Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease

Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease generally affects smaller breeds, such as Biewers. Causing joint pain and damage, Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease manifests in the hip joint and causes wearing and arthritic changes. Biewers with Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease typically limp, hold their hind legs abnormally, have less strength in their hind legs, and have a harder time participating in high-exercise activities.

This condition can be commonly confused with hip dysplasia because of similar symptoms and joint effects. The main difference between Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease and hip dysplasia is the cause of this wear and tear. With hip dysplasia, scar tissue and painful symptoms build because of abnormalities within the hip joint itself. With Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease, an aseptic death of the head of the femur is the culprit of this wear and tear. Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease can be managed by a vet.

Joint Health Options We Love

  1. VetIQ Hip & Joint Supplement for Dogs, Chicken Flavored Soft Chews, 180 Count
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    10/04/2022 12:05 am GMT
  3. PetNC Natural Care Hip and Joint Soft Chews for Dogs, 90 Count
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    10/04/2022 12:04 am GMT

Skin and Coat Health of Biewers

Biewers are known for their beautiful and unique coats that can grow to an impressive length. This is what sets them apart from other breeds, and the Biewer Terrier coat is treasured by its owners all over the world. This beautiful trait is the reason that the Biewer was recognized as a separate breed from their cousins, the Yorkshire Terriers.

There are a variety of skin and coat health issues that all breeds can be prone to. The most common skin and coat condition for Biewers to face is called alopecia. While some Biewers will experience this, not all will. Just because Biewers are prone to alopecia doesn’t mean that this condition is inevitable. Nevertheless, knowing the signs and symptoms of this condition is the best way to get your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult prompt medical care if this condition does arise.

Alopecia

Alopecia is partial or complete lack of hair where it is normally present. This condition can affect both humans and dogs, including Biewers. Hair loss is the most common sign of this condition, and it can be caused by a variety of factors. This condition can be existent at birth or be acquired later in life.

Itching and skin inflammation may also be existent with alopecia. Depending on what causes alopecia in Biewers, the hair loss may be a moth-eaten appearance within the fur, round and focal areas of hair loss. Biewers may also experience a symmetrical hair loss on either side of their body.

There are many different types of alopecia that dogs can experience, though the most common for Biewers to experience is called follicular dysplasia. Follicular dysplasia affects specific breeds and causes a poor hair coat that has the moth-eaten appearance that was described above. This condition is caused by genetics and is inherited. Because of this, alopecia typically can’t be prevented in Biewers. Follicular dysplasia isn’t contagious, so you don’t have to worry about your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult catching this condition from another dog or spreading it to anyone else.

When diagnosing the cause of hair loss, your vet will perform different tests. Skin scrapings for parasites and mites, blood tests, and skin biopsies may be necessary to narrow down the cause of hair loss in your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult. Once other causes have been ruled out, alopecia will likely be decided on as a diagnosis.

Treatments for alopecia can vary based on the type of hair loss and cause that they are experiencing. In genetic cases such as the ones that Biewers experience, there may not be a cure, though this condition can be managed by your vet. In addition, there are steps that you can take to combat Biewer Terrier alopecia at home.

One of the best ways to combat skin and coat health issues such as alopecia is through diet and supplementation. As stated earlier, omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants have been shown to improve skin health. These can easily be added to your Biewer Terrier’s diet through specialized foods and supplements. Be sure to talk with your vet before beginning new supplements or dietary changes. Fish oil pills are another great, natural way to add omega-3 fatty acids to your Biewer Terrier’s diet.

Shampoos can also help combat dry skin. Those with oatmeal, tea tree oil, and aloe vera can ensure your Biewer Terrier’s skin is moisturized and healthy, which can promote hair growth. Be sure to discuss with your vet before beginning new shampoos with a Biewer Terrier puppy or adult that is experiencing alopecia. If your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult is experiencing itchiness alongside alopecia, this should be looked into as a possible separate condition, such as an infection.

While alopecia can be concerning for any Biewer Terrier owner, this condition can be combated by both you and your vet. Alopecia won’t take any years off of the life expectancy of your Biewer Terrier puppy or adult, meaning you can still spend many treasured days together doing the things that you love.

Skin and Coat Health Options We Love